Monday, April 11, 2011

"In Affectionate Remembrance"




Headstone of Aircraftwoman Gladys E. Hadwin
Whitehaven Cemetery, Cumberland (now Cumbria)


Aircraftwoman Gladys Edith Hadwin (WAAF) died on 5 October 1945 while still on wartime service, aged 26 years. Aircraftwoman Hadwin was originally from Lewsiham (London) although she was laid to rest at Whitehaven - the hometown of her husband Daniel Lennox Hadwin. The following inscription is engraved on her headstone:

"In affectionate remembrance of an unselfish and loving wife".

For additional information click on 'Comments' below

1 Comments:

Blogger ritsonvaljos said...

Aircraftwoman Gladys E. Hadwin (nee Bunyard), WAAF, Service No 2003500 died, aged 26, at Meathop Sanatorium, Grange-Over-Sands. This is situated on the northern side of Morecambe Bay and at that time (up to 1948) Meathop was the 'Westmorland Sanatorium and Home for Consumption' (i.e. for the treatment and care of tuberculosis). This was a period when it was still relatively common for young people to contract, and even die from, tuberculosis.

On 9 October 1945, four days after Gladys Hadwin passed away, she was interred in Whitehaven Cemetery (Grave Ref. 6 / E / 399). The funeral service was conducted by Reverend Clifford W. Hutchings (Congregational Minister for Whitehaven, 1932 - 1949). Although she was serving with the WAAF, the Whitehaven burial register rather poignantly records Gladys' occupation as a "Wife".

According to the Commowealth War Graves Commission Gladys Hadwin was the daughter of Ruben and Edith Bunyard and the husband of Daniel L. Hadwin. Daniel was the son of Daniel Cain Hadwin and Marguerite Hadwin (nee Hampton). On a far happier day for both families, Gladys and Daniel had been married at Lewisham in 1942.

Daniel Hadwin passed away on 2 December 1969, aged 62. Daniel was also interred at this place, although he has a separate memorial.

Gladys and Daniel were together again.

Reuocatis (Reunited)
-------------------------

Standing at this place and seeing the golden daffodils dancing in the breeze, brings to mind the following words of John Milton:

"Death is the golden key that opens the palace of Eternity".

May they rest in peace!
-------------------------

Sunday, 17 April, 2011  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home